By browsing our site you agree to our use of cookies.

Accept these cookie
Facebook Page Twitter Page Google+ Page
Beemers & Braces #1 - Justification

Beemers & Braces #1 - Justification

Here we unravel a bit of design talk (technical jargon) and reveal a few interesting design(ish) facts!

Did you know?…

JPEG, an image file type which you 
take with your digital camera or phone camera stands for Joint Photographic Experts Group.
HTML is the basic building-blocks of 
a web page and stands for Hypertext 
Markup Language.
PDF which you use for viewing 
documents electronically, stands for Portable Document Format.

File sizes explained (kind of!):

What do we mean by screen resolution and print resolution?
When we say an image is screen resolution in technical terms it is 72 Pixels Per Inch (PPI), meaning that within a one inch square on your screen there is 72 pixels. Images at 72 PPI are usually used for websites and emailing as they are very small in file size, usually between 1 and 100 kilobytes.

If printed they would be very, very small, we’re talking postage stamp-sized.

When we say an image is print resolution in technical terms it is 300 Pixels Per Inch. That’s right, within one square inch on your screen there’s 300 pixels. This is considerably larger and can be used for printing good quality through your ink jet or on a printing press. An A4 sized image at print resolution will be about 2 megabytes.

Here’s how a kilobyte (used to measure screen resolution images) relates to a megabyte:

1 kilobyte    (KB)    = 1024 bytes


1 megabyte    (MB)    = 1024 kilobytes


1 gigabyte    (GB)    = 1024 Megabytes


1 terabyte    (TB)    = 1024 Gigabytes


1 petabyte    (PB)    = 1024 terabytes

Fact of the month:

Google processes about 24 petabytes 
of data per day. – That’s a lot of data!

Justification

What do we mean by justify text?
In typesetting, justification (can also be referred to as ‘full justification’) is the typographic alignment setting of text or images within a column or “measure” to align along both the left and right margin. Text set this way is said to be “justified”.

Comments are closed.